Skip to main content

About your Search

20131118
20131118
STATION
CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 7
CSPAN3 3
MSNBCW 3
CNBC 2
FBC 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
CNNW 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
SFGTV 1
SFGTV2 1
LANGUAGE
English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
thought. in fact, when scott brown won that seat in massachusetts, you voted so quickly to ensure that not one republican will have input in the senate. and you now you complain about republicans being part of the fix. you didn't care what we had to say during the time. >> this is not true. >> nancy pelosi made it clear. you'll have to read the bill when it's passed. because you didn't want to take the time to listen to republican ideas to get republican input and now you want to blame us. that's not how it works. >> the secret is this whole thing was bit on conservative republican ideas in the first place that you all cut and ran from because this president is the one who promoted it. >> zero votes. zero republican votes because you didn't want to work with us. you didn't care about our ideas. and now you want to blame us. it doesn't work that way. >> that's just not how it happened. >> when we passed part "d" and that's a great success. >> guys, we've got to leave it there. mo from the dnc, sean from the rnc, this was fun. let's do it again. >> thanks for having us. >> thanks. >
and as a psychiatrist practiced three years with the chief residents -- resident of massachusetts general. then as a speechwriter for vice president mondale for their presidential campaign then when he came to the new republic in 1981. that was the golden age. and what was interesting is of group of people with a group of ideas that frequently fought over them but at any rate charles won the national award at coveted prize then when it to go to "the washington post" and since it has continued to write for the "washington post" as it is an inspiring columnist you write one column per week it you cannot do more than that but it called the most powerful force kahane of american kazoo for to miss them. calling him the most important conservative columnist. you can hear him tonight to hear questions from the floor so save up your questions you are in for a real treat. mr. krauthammer. [applause] >> 84 being here mr. president and mrs. bush. there are nice introductions and there are kind introductions that lists your achievements transcribe and notarize to end said your mother a copy. to state
the fox news deck. >> watching three developing stories right now. first, massachusetts, four people found dead in one home two adults and two little kids. we're expecting new information in a news conference from police at any minute. we'll have it for you. george zimmerman arrested again. there's the new mug shot. we're waiting for the 9-1-1 call. >>> and a live look at a scene in toronto, where -- well, it will be, anyway -- where the city council is moving to strip the crack-smoking mayor of more of his power. >>> his fox news interview. >> i admitted to using illegal drugs in the last year. okay. i've admitted to drinking too much. okay. >> and there's much more to come from north america's mayor. so let's get too -- let's get to it. >> first from the news deck at 3:00 in new york city, hundreds of families are searching through piles of debris to find what remains of their homes and their lives. weather officials say more than 40 twisters tore across a wide stretch of the midwest over the weekend, bulldozing house after house, and littering entire town with debris. most people scramm
in massachusetts, and became so outraged by how politics adversely affected her patients that she became the green party candidate for president in 2012. inevitably, the paths of these two crossed. and in the proud tradition of american civil disobedience, they have joined hands to take on the system together, fighting against political corruption and a host of grievances that have led many others to cynicism and despair. each is a member of the green shadow cabinet, a group that offers policy alternatives to our dysfunctional government, and just days ago, they joined with the group nukefree.org to present a petition to the un -- 150,000 signatures -- asking the world to intercede at the fukushima nuclear plant in japan. the meltdown of reactors there after the earthquake and tsunami of march 2011 still threatens much of the world with radiation. japanese officials now say that residents of the area will never be able to return to their homes. radiation from the disaster has reached alaska and the canadian scientist david suzuki recently called attention to research saying that another quake hitt
in stockbridge massachusetts is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you for that fabulously gracious introduction and i'm glad. i can't believe that the archive has been digitized now that i'm done. i wore gloves fy read through the papers but it's hard to turn pages. i'm glad to know that other people can now do it in ten minutes. i came to this book from the historical background and i studied history at cornell and attended college in the 70's at a time when abstract expressionism was seen as the high point as the great savior because it was said he shifted that capital. they have a mystical flying through the sky shifting the capitol. and the studied rockwell and i didn't really think about rockwell until other people started thinking about him first such as robert rosenblum who organized the show at the guggenheim museum in 2001. and i was immediately taken by the work. partly because i had been tired of spending my intellectual life at greenwich village in the 50's. i felt like i can't think again about that. his word struck me as really interesting. so i sort of took it started when i did
and recovery, cambridge, massachusetts; jim williams, executive director, the association of recovery schools, houston, texas. ben, the millennial generation goes 18- to 25-year-olds, more or less. talk to me about what are the major characteristics of this cohort? i really think our ability to connect using social media and all the other technology resources are really a strength and a defining characteristic of this age group. very good. alison, obviously, we have heard of the many challenges in the mental health area that this generation faces. can you describe some of those challenges for us? sure; this generation is facing mental health challenges that we haven't seen in generations past, and i think ranging from them growing up with instances like 9/11, columbine, virginia tech, some of the more prominent mental health and tragic situations have really just caused young adults to grow up in a different environment, in a different world. and at the same time, there's more awareness around mental health issues, and there's some more talking about it. and so young adults are little more kn
to be. i'm happy to share some of it with you today. from massachusetts rotary. it's about 5 miles north. as it turned out, the population is about 55,000. when i was writing this book i subleased a ten by ten office space from a local architect who was in fact a one-term rotary president and now signing up for a second term. he told me before i came in and told them i was coming to speak to one of the most prestigious and oldest and certainly friendliest rotary's in wichita, may be bigger he said, keep it short. these people around the lunch break. [laughter] but i did hear an awful lot. i'm glad to hear you guys don't sign each other. sure did not know how to keep the short. i think some of you in toward that. he was a faithful rotarian for more than 50 years. this was his club. he joined in 1950, and you can usually find in here without fail on monday. if he was out of town they often made it a point to visit with the rotary clubs like we have today. different cities in the united states. they claim -- it became clear. i have two books of features. he gave an awful lot of speeches her
there's nothing before the states office the duo minute massachusetts has the component side of it but there's the fee side it would be tough to have a system be approved on secretaries day to be awarded the privilege to execute a contract and the system to be up in a couple of years >> just is quick question to follow up. the question about an all mail in election you have to be enabled by the state; right? no matter what type of election whatever it is it has to be approved by state >> that goes back and forth. i've heard it through the vote by mail but really it might be r be a question formerly to the city attorney's office >> complaegz any other questions i hope you get some rest and a mr. rose budget analyst report. >> yes. as shown this tables 2 and 3 those tables are on pages 17 and 18 of our report. the proposed cost a as indicated would remain at the same rate of $400,000 plus and 3 hundred plus for maintenance and license agreement and ross the rates that are currently charges under the existing 2007 to 2013 agreement. we also point out over the 3 year shown i
more dangerous? like a tryannosaurus. >> in massachusetts the animal league of boston jumped into a rescue site to rescue this guy, a wild coyote. >> in this particular case, this coyote had fell into the found as area of this construction site so it was trapped by these giant concrete walls. so the animal rescue league of boston, this dude with his net, scooped the coyote up, hands the net up to his partner up there and watch -- >> that's a good looking coyote, too. >> he's so handsome. >> a relative of wiley. >> this is the result of a road runner prank. >> they get the net back up, the coyote frees himself and runs off, completely uninjured in the fall. they said the kie olie was doing fall. he went back to fight another battle or find his family. >> we have more winners in the flat screen tv give away. >> melissa won in ohio. >> and dellano jennings. >> and you have a chance to win a flat screen a little later in our show. >> need monday's buzz word, be 18 or older and be a u.s. resident to enter. >> the buzz word is coming up, your chance to win a flat screen tv. >> gopr
was the scott brown win in massachusetts and the special election. a lot of national attention to that money. and the center -- at the center of that race was obama care. hasn't passed yet. but scott brown was supposed to be the senator who could stop it. and then the 2010 election, republicans won and the wave in the house made some gains in the senate but weren't able to win some of the key races. and think about what republicans have lost since president obama was first elected in 2008. 2012, mitt romney lost that election. he explicitly did not run against obama care. did not run on health care. he was trying to get away from his record with romney care in massachusetts. so i think that republicans are looking at this from a political perspective, they've got to see -- they've got to see victory and criticizing obama care in going after and being aggressive on health care. but that's also going to require a plan of their own. something that there's a lot of things in the house, a few in the senate, that the republicans are throwing out there, good ideas, i think. but we need to have some
ridicule by calling those numbers consistent with what massachusetts, a state of only 6.5 million people, experienced in its initial rollout of romney care. sebelius also did not reveal the number of people who have actually paid for their new plans. she did not explain why the obama administration will withhold those numbers from the public until the middle of next month. >> the numbers are consistent with enrollment numbers that massachusetts reported and that we feel are the most accurate. by the 15th of december, we'll be able to begin to tell you how many people actually have paid for the first month of coverage. >> the sebelius revelations come after hours of heated testimony in front of two separate house committees. the top government technology officials grilled by house oversight on when the website will be fixed, and why it was launched without proper tesng. and department of homeland security officials questioned by the committee on the site's lack of cybersecurity. fox news chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel with our report. >> reporter: many house lawmakers gave
. and they would see more if west virginia changed its name to -- or if massachusetts had stamped land of candidate on its license plate. george orwell once wrote that it was impossible to prove definitively that shakespeare had been a great author. and said there is no test of literary merit except survival, which is in itself an index of majority opinion. i that stand alone can be have been a great president. author james macgregor burns the road the only authorized biography of jfk before the election said, although it was an admiring biography, burns criticized him for lacking moral passion, too much to his intellect, jewish to start. in short, being more harbored an -- harvard than irish. face explain -- lacking passion had excited such passionate grief, burns wrote, was it that he was handsome? his wife and kids? a statesman who have cute kids? he concluded it had to be something that transcended all this. i think the transcendent reason was that kennedy was being mourned for his promise as much as for his accomplishments. and that those accomplishments and the promise had become more evident
i say it? bridgewater, massachusetts. here's her story. it all started with a letter from a childhood friend. >> my best friend since chile hood is incredibly deserving of one of the new cars. >> reporter: they've been friends since they were both 4 years old. >> it breaks my heart to hear that she's struggling. >> reporter: beloved in her hometown of bridgewater, massachusetts, she's known as the most generous lady in town. >> if she had five cents in her pocket and you asked for $5, she would give you $5. >> she made the game fun for a lot of kids in bridgewater. >> my mom is a great lady. she does everything for me. >> she works really hard. >> her friends call her the town taxi, using her 11-year-old minivan to help any way she can. >> half the kids in the whole community have been in this car because she's making sure that she's getting everybody here, there, and everywhere. >> reporter: but that old minivan's days with over 200,000 miles are numbered. the steering is spotty. the windows don't roll down. it's unlikely the van will pass inspection again. >> the money i
the country. it has been easy for republicans to fight it. the republican points to massachusetts, but that law had huge bipartisan support in the state legislature, making it easy to go back and fix things when they did not work and tinker with it. host: here is a little bit from the ident late last week. [video clip] >> those who got cancellation notices do deserve and have received an apology from me. they want, whether we can make sure that they are in a better place and that we meet that commitment. by the way, it is important to note that a whole bunch of folks in congress and others who made this statement, they were entirely sincere about it. the fact that you have got this percentage of people who have had this impact, i want them to know that their senator or congressman, they were making representations based on what i told them and what the white house and the administrative staff told them. it is on us. it is something that we intend to fix. host: kyle cheney? guest: the president has been getting an earful from congress, democrats in congress, about the fact that the
were you? guest: i was a freshman at the university of massachusetts at amherst, walking to class. the news spread like wildfire. nobody believed it. class was adjourned and we all went home. host: why 50 years later do we still feel compelled to reflect on the kennedy presidency? was this a turning point in the 20th century? guest: it is what might have been a turning point. the reason i think there is so much interest in the legacy of president kennedy is for what his administration stood for, this notion that every single person can make a difference in our country. the optimism that public service is a noble undertaking, that government is here to help, it's not the enemy. these concepts that president kennedy promoted, with the founding of the peace corps and the initiatives he undertook, this is something that contrasts with the political polarization today that you look back at those halcion days and say to yourself what might have been. host: he served only two years and 10 months, and people look at what happened before his assassination and the events that unfolded after
the 50's and 60's it's amazing. [laughter] he was a big liberal. he talked in massachusetts. just people picking up the saturday evening post and not really bothering to look at his paintings and describing rockwell paintings and i don't think that people really took the time to realize what an original he was. but i think in many ways it goes beyond the in many cases so much more. >> [inaudible] [applause] >>> up next on book tv, after words with debbie hines creator of legal speaks blog. this week, abbe contributing authors to how can you represent those people, the director and supervisor of georgetown law school criminal defense and prisoner advocacy clinic discuss the defense attorneys answers to the professional question the year asked most often how they are able to defend those that commit the worst crimes. the program is about an hour. >> i am so glad to be doubled to interview you on your book how can you represent those people. it was a very interesting and thought-provoking book and i don't say that lightly because if it weren't i wouldn't say otherwise but it was defi
this happened and it was discovered that the tainted drugs graham the massachusetts compounding pharmacy, there was a loft finger pointing back and forth between the f.d.a. and the state board about who should have been regulating this pharmacy because there were other trouble signs. this never should have happened. if they had been properly regulated either by the state or by the federal agency, the f.d.a. that often happens when there's not accountability, when it's not clear who's on the flagpole as i like to say, when it's not clear who's in clarnlg. i use the example of admiral highman rickover who was a gluk bruk navy officer but in the 1950's when he was assigned the job of the nuclear navy he told his captains two contingency things. number one, you're in charge of the ship, you're in charge of the reactor, if anything goes wrong with the nuclear reactor, your career is over. as a result,, mr. president, and i'm sure as a result of that level of clear accountability, since the 1950's there has never been a death as a result of a reactor accident on one of our nuclear ships. this
stories right now. first, massachusetts, four people found dead in one home two adults and two little kids. we're expecting new information in a news conference from police at any minute. we'll have it for you. george zimmerman arrested again. there's the new mug shot. we're waiting for the 9-1-1 call. >>> and a live look at a scene in toronto, where -- well, it will be, anyway -- where the city council is moving to strip the crack-smoking mayor of more of his power. >>> his fox news interview. >> i admitted to using illegal drugs in the last year. okay. i've admitted to drinking too much. okay. >> and there's much more to come from north america's mayor. so let's
at his son's same sex wedding in massachusetts. the fellow on left could choose to tea frock him as a minister or choose to do nothing. the church's teeings on homosexuality are discriminatory. the prosecut prosecutors got a y against james hole holmes. >> the prosecution can use ed that they found right there in his amount including the home-made bombs and a calendar with the shootings highlighted. the apartment search was illegal because it began before the police obtained a warm. holmes faces charges for the july 2012 attack that killed 12 and injured several others in his trial is to begin in february. >> today a russian court granded bail for two green peace activists. despite the water cannons and everything else being poured on them they tried to scale an offshore oil rig which is crucial. each member you see them appearing in court if convicted face up to seven years in a russian jail. several western leaders and paul mccartney have asked russian leaders to release these activists. >> finally you stay classy emerson college. emerson anew jerseyed it will host after will f
being a part of the administration. i couldn't. i was writing my book, living in massachusetts. it was more to stay friendship with the speechwriters. and a friendship with president obama. >> what should the public know about historians' relationships with presidents? >> i am not sure i feel able to write about a koran president. i like the distance -- current president. i like the distance. the only one i ever knew that i wrote about was lyndon johnson. it presented all these turbulent problems because i knew the guy. i certainly couldn't have done it until after he died. ever since that, it started everything. i wouldn't be a presidential historian without that wonderful character. nonetheless, i feel more writing from the treasures and diaries back 100 years ago. kennedy, a historian from stamford says, it was almost as if he was writing his own history book about himself. >> i think he thinks about that. these presidents inevitably do now. as soon as they get into office, and people are talking about, where is he going to rank? they start thinking that way. he especially h
in concord, massachusetts. so it was more a friendship of the speech writers and the friendship with president obama. >> what should the public know about historians' relationships with president s? >> the interesting thing is i'm not sure i'd feel able to write about a current president because i like the distance that the time -- the only one i ever wrote about that i knew was lincoln johnson. that presented all of the turbulent problems. i knew the guy. how much of what he told me could i talk about? i couldn't have done it until after he died. but every since that, even though i'm so grateful to my relationship to lbj, it started everything. i wouldn't have been a presidential historian without that incredibly wonderful character. nonetheless, i feel more comfortable not trading on what i know from the people now and rather writing from the treasures and the diaries back 100 years ago. i don't think i could write about a current president. >> david kennedy, historian from stanford in this piece, it was almost like he was writing his own history book about himself. >> i think
. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. >>> ten years to the day after massachusetts became the first state to legalize same-sex marriage, the party doesn't get it's a civil rights thing. since the landmark ruling 15 states have joined the bay state ensuring marng equality. on wednesday illinois will become the 16th state when mayor pat quinn signs marriage equality into law. in nine years support from same-sex marriage has gone from 42% to 54%. some folks haven't gotten the memo yet. by some folks that is to say leading voices in the republican party. on saturday marco rubio holland a fundraiser for the group that pushed same-sex marriage ban in 2008. a day before that john boehner hosted a group called world congress of names in the capital. according to the website for the world congress of families, marriage between a man and a woman forms the moral context for national sexual union, whether through pornography, promiscuity, incest, homosexuality, deviations from created social norms cannot truly satisfy human spirit. they led to depression, remorse, alienation and disea
massachusetts. ms. warren: i ask that the quorum be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. warren: mr. president, i rise today to talk about the retirement cries in this country, a crisis at that has received far too little attention and far too little response from washington. i spent most of my career studying the economic pressures on middle-class families, families who worked hard, who played by the rules, but who still found themselves just hanging on by their fingernails. starting in the 1970's, even as workers became more productive, their wages flattened out, while things like health care and sending their kid to college kept going up. workers rolled up their slieiv , sent both pairptses into the workforce. that meant higher child care costs, a second car and higher taxes. they just tightened their belts more cutting spending wherever they could. adjusted for inflation, families spend less than they did a generation ago on food, clothing, furniture, appliances and other flexible purchases. when that still wasn't enough to cover rising costs, they took on debt, cree
, the romney plan in massachusetts. this was meant, in fact, to be -- and we moved direction of state by state, because of the -- in the midst of discussing the affordable care act, we wanted to move to a state-by-state basis. so many states, as you know, 33, a third, have opted out. where -- where the exchange is working, in my state of connecticut, 13,000 people signed up. about 7,500 of the private side. about 5,000 or more than that a little bit more than that on the medicaid side. kentucky, california, washington state. the state exchanges are working, because there is a genuine interest in providing health care, again, to people -- some people who have never had it. and to make health care affordable for people. now, the -- what's happened in these other areas -- you take -- take states -- texas. florida. they are doing everything that they can to sabotage the affordable care act. and it really is pretty outrageous. you know, we all take an oath to saying we can uphold the constitution. our offices are there to provide information to our constituents, whether we like a program or don't l
points to massachusetts, but that law had huge bipartisan support in the state legislature, making it easy to go back and fix things when they did not work and tinker with it. host: here is a little bit from the president late last week. [video clip] who got cancellation notices do deserve and have received an apology from me. they want, whether we can make sure that they are in a better place and that we meet that commitment. by the way, it is important to note that a whole bunch of folks who madess and others this statement, they were entirely sincere about it. thisact that you have got percentage of people who have had this impact, i want them to know that their senator or congressman, they were making representations based on what i told them and what the white and the administrative staff told them. it is on us. it is something that we intend to fix. host: kyle cheney? guest: the president has been getting an earful from congress, democrats in congress, about the fact that they stuck their necks out for him when he said if you like your health plan, you can keep it. andcrats p
are uninsured. massachusetts is a model. what gets missed is massachusetts implemented five steps over 20 years. we're implementing five steps on one day. >> can we slow it down then? >> i don't think where we are now we can slow it down. that's why i think the whole question of collaboration among the key players is critical. you've got to get people together who are committed to making this work. i think the health plans are in it, consumer groups are in it. and i think that the physician and hospital community. you can't make policy from a political perspective and then turn it over to people to implement. we end up with what we have. >> just so i understand, you said it happened over 20 years, what happened? >> the first thing they combined the individual and small group market. the next thing they did was eliminate age, rating and compressed the age rating. then a few years later, they eliminated gender rating. then they eliminated the medical underwriting. and then the last step was the requirement for the individual mandate. so that was a culmination of a 20-year process. and what we're
care in massachusetts in. >> it was i think in all things we all try to improve people's lives and i know when mitt was working with health care he was very concerned about people that were, didn't have coverage who had preexisting conditions. for him it was important that people would be able to have coverage. he has also felt all along that a president's approach would not work, that his was very much designed just for the state of massachusetts. we didn't have that many uninsured that if they tried to implement his program across the country it would not work and he also -- i'm sure there's implementation problems right now. maybe they'll get that fixed but he really believes the whole structure is flawed and it will not be effective. >> when you go to having your life, living your life in the spotlight for so many years, then you get to go back to whatever can feel like normal after it, you see kind of the bitter partisan politics, the state of play in washington right now. do you ever have a moment when you think, phew, i'm glad we're not in the white house? >> no, i would love
never been seen in public. >> reporter: the store front on main street in amesbury massachusetts, is modest. but inside the auction house they've collected some extraordinary pieces of kennedy memorabilia. here's the president's cape cod rocking chair. it's one of more than a dozen he used. some have sold for more than 400,000. tell me what these are. >> these are '50s presidential bill-signing pens that were used by president kennedy and after he passed lyndon johnson. >> reporter: pens says dan meter, that signed some of the most notable bills of the 20th century. the civil rights act, food stamp act. >> yes. take a look at this one. >> reporter: expanded space program, man on the moon. you've sold before a single pen that signed the cuban missile crisis legislation for how much? >> yes. $28,000. >> reporter: and this is 50. >> this is 50 pens. >> reporter: a complete set of the warren commission report on the kennedy assassination presented to former cia chief alan dulles and signed by dulles and all his fellow commission members. and this autographed picture
the website. this system that's being used in obama care is pretty much what mitt romney did in massachusetts and it worked very well. five years later, 98.5% have the health insurance. it's extraordinary in this country. and people are pretty happy with romney care. i think in the long run this does work but the website is a screw-up. >> you know this, if you can't get sufficient momentum moving forward, actually it might not work. it could collapse back and that is the fear and i would argue that the gop has given you guys the runaround here. on the one hand they say we won't support obama care at the state level. you put it on the federal system and see if your i.t. works on that. and then on friday they are coming back and saying they are substandard policies. let's subspend them for a year. who is going to be based on obama care are the old and sick people with pre-existing conditions. they are running the democrats right, center, and left on this. >> i would agree with that. but i do think in the long run, even though this wasn't the program that i thought we should have put in, this wi
from bin laden. so within 48 hours, the threat to massachusetts, boston, and the convention was completely eliminated. the thousands or millions of man hours that would have been wasted had it not been them giving us that investigation, they maybe still be standing on the bridges. maybe they would have prevented the marathon bombings by being there looking for the terrorists, but that was a tremendous savings. in my view, putting other analysts in beijing paid for itself in savings to u.s. taxpayers because of being able to resolve an issue of terrorism when there was no intent or knowledge that that office would be a key player in the war on terror. >> next question. yes, sir, here. >> john duncan, florida a&m university college of law. we talk about the chinese and japanese russian mafia here in the u.s. how about our u.s. gangs possibly overseas, and i'm thinking not only cooperation with other gangs, but also the national security impacts back on us. and because i say, you know, a lot of the new millionaires will be in china and russia and that's where the money is going
, but massachusetts, they did and it worked and god bless them. we were all looking for ways to expand and cover more people. then all of a sudden this comes down, they jump to 133. and i've said this. i said i don't -- i'm not worried about the computer glitch, the rollout, they'll fix that, that's mechanical. they've got a product, they've got a product problem. and the product problem is this. if we want to give the best care we can, right, medicaid and all that. but if i'm at 135% and you're at 132% and might be $400 between the cutoff, you might have more access than i have to something i'm being forced to buy and being penalized if i don't buy. that's a product problem. and we'll fix it. how do we give a young person the incentive to say i want to buy that insurance because when i'm 40, i'll have a good healthy track record and get discounts. if i don't get in, i can. >> i mean, the thing that strikes me about both of you guys, you're talking substantively about trying to fix things or enact things. and a huge part of the narrative is break it, repeal it, we're done with it. and i would ask you
was from massachusetts. as tip o'neil who later became speaker was as well. i think he was critical. i think in the senate leader was senator mike mansfield. he was a wonderful, wonderful man. and johnson and a very, very, you know, almost holy, almost saintly man. and johnson used to say, why do i have a saint for a majority leader. russell long, the chairman of the senate finance committee and wilbur mills, the chairman of the house ways and means committee. and it was -- russell -- richard russell, who was johnson's mentor and actually, i have a wonderful -- russell came to see johnson to tell him that he was going to have to filibuster on the voting rights act. on the civil rights act of 1964. and johnson and johnson said, classic johnson story. he said, you know, dick, and russell said, mr. president, i have to make a stand. there's a point at which i have to stand somewhere. and johnson said you know, dick, you remind me and he knew this would really grate on russell, he said of that negro boy in bed with that white woman and her husband comes home and she says, my god, it's my h
the country. it has been easy for republicans to fight it. the president points to massachusetts, but that law had huge bipartisan support in the state legislature, making it easy to go back and fix things when they did not work and tinker with it. host: here is a little bit from the president late last week. [video clip] >> those who got cancellation notices do deserve and have received an apology from me. they want whether we can make sure that they are in a better place and that we meet that commitment. by the way, it is important to note that a whole bunch of folks in congress and others who made this statement, they were entirely sincere about it. the fact that you have got this percentage of people who have had this impact, i want them to know that their senator or congressman, they were making representations based on what i told them and what the white house and the administrative staff told them. it is on us. it is something that we intend to fix. host: kyle cheney? guest: the president has been getting an earful from congress, democrats in congress, about the fact that they stuck the
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)